Contributor Archives: Dano Pendygrasse

Dano Pendygrasse

About Dano Pendygrasse

Dano's photography was born from a love of snowboarding and has evolved into nothing less than an obsession. Obviously influenced by the amazing natural surroundings of British Columbia, Dano finds interesting stories in the details and textures that surround him and tries to share those stories with his camera when he can.

Captive. A fitting final entry to my bneeth contributions

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Over the course of a little over a year I’ve shared some parts of my creative process in photography. In the end I tried out a bunch of different cameras to solve a creative problem and came up with a pretty good solution. But when that story ends, another begins and the search for a different tool takes over. Read more

Just one shot.

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The thing about creativity is that it’s not a tangible thing. You can’t go to the store and pick up a quart of creativity every time you need it, and because of this cruel reality there are times when the creative well runs dry.  I suppose that it’s all in the eye of the beholder anyway, I mean, it’s likely that very few people pay close attention to the output of any one artist to the degree that they could sense an ebb in output in the span of a few months. Still, when you’re in the desert, it feels like everyone knows you’re blowing it and that can add to a creative slump. Read more

Transition. Part Four: Finally found what I’m looking for.

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Last time I took you diving, but I still hadn’t found the camera I was looking for. I’d reached the end of the road with what I could accomplish with the Canon G9 and its successors weren’t moving in a direction that I liked. I needed more resolution and flexibility in a small package. Fortunately in the summer of 2009 Panasonic announced the GF1 micro four thirds camera and many of my questions were answered. The GF1 is a mirrorless system, so it’s small, but it has a large sensor so it makes good images. It was bigger than the point and shoot, but the size was worth it. Read more

Transition. Part Three: Fuck it, I’m going swimming.

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Around the time I became a convert to small cameras, I started scuba diving a lot. Obviously the two things would eventually meet and I’d get hooked on shooting underwater photos. I was torn because underwater photography is probably the most expensive form of photography I can think of, and it’s also incredibly difficult and prone to disaster. The thing about taking electronics a hundred feet underwater is that, well, they get flooded and ruined. A lot.

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Transition. Part Two: Shoot Something!

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After some deliberation, I found myself a convert to using smaller cameras.  As a result of switching to smaller cameras, I had my trusted Canon g9 with me at all times. What I still hadn’t figured out though, was what I wanted to take pictures of.  This is still part of a long process that continues to this day. The first step in figuring out what to shoot was to document my steps…….. Read more

Transition. Part One: Now what?

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The one thing I knew for sure when I stopped shooting photos of action sports was that I wasn’t going to stop taking photos. I simply couldn’t. As much as the creative life is like a cruel pendulum sometimes, with swings of deep dissatisfaction and swings that feel like brilliance, the one thing I knew for sure was that taking photos was no longer something that I had the option to do. I had grown to the point where if I went any length of time without shooting something good, a part of me started to feel off. It was akin to going a long time without sex. It doesn’t kill you, but it grinds away at your soul until you finally have to scratch that itch.

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TRANSITION

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After shooting action sports full-time for almost 20 years, I quit. I was successful and had accomplished some amazing things. Most people thought I had a dream job, but I knew that I was done with it. The fire was out and nothing could relight it.

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